BREVARD COUNTY, Fla. -

The controversial book "Fifty Shades of Grey" is about to return to Brevard County libraries.

Late Monday, the county announced the book would be available again after a strong outcry from readers

"I am very happy to hear that," said reader Doreen Sley. "I'm glad to have my choices back."

The book was pulled earlier this month because of its sexually explicit content.

After an outpouring of criticism from anti-censorship advocates locally and nationwide, global media attention and threats of legal action, county officials said Monday that 19 copies of “Fifty Shades” are available “effective immediately.”

But the book's waiting list has more than 200 people on it-so readers shouldn't expect to get the book immediately.

While word came last week that the book would be returned to circulation, details arrived in a statement posted on Memorial Day on the county’s website. In it, officials said “the decision is in response to public demand, but also comes after considerable review and consideration by the library system.”

The decision to remove the sexually explicit book, the first of a trilogy, came “as a result of published reviews and our own initial analysis of the book and its controversial content,” the statement said. A review of the system’s selection criteria followed, “and that review continues even as the decision has been made to supply the book in response to requests by county residents.”

Cathy Schweinsberg, library services director, ordered the book’s removal from the county’s 17 libraries after reading “Fifty Shades.”

“We have always stood against censorship,” Schweinsberg said in the statement. "We have a long history of standing against censorship and that continues to be a priority for this library system.”

The American Civil Liberties Union of Florida had notified county commissioners it was considering legal action.

“Obviously, we’re very happy with the decision,” Derek Newton, ACLU spokesman in Miami, said Monday.

“We view it as a victory for the First Amendment. We’re happy that the county has decided to protect the rights of area residents by making this material available.”

Linda Tyndall of Viera, outspoken against the ban from the start, is thrilled to see "Fifty Shades" back on shelves. It's the “ultimate hands-on lesson in civics” for her 16-year-old daughter, Rebecca, who is home-schooled, she said.

“This is a huge victory for Brevard County; for anybody who believes in freedom of speech and not letting censorship take a front seat in this day and age … adults can make their own decisions about what they read and don’t read,” Tyndall said.

The two, who traveled to Miami in late April to meet “Fifty Shades” author E.L. James, drew almost 2,000 signatures on an online petition supporting the book’s circulation.

Mother and daughter voiced their views in newspapers and on Facebook, appeared on TV and were bombarded with emails and calls.

Only one book had been removed from Brevard libraries before “Fifty Shades” -- Madonna’s “Sex,” published in 1992.