ORLANDO, Fla. -

A 41-year-old woman in Osceola County has been diagnosed on Thursday with dengue fever based, according to the Osceola County Health Department.

The woman was diagnosed based on her symptoms and later confirmed through lab tests. A 19-year-old male near the University of Central Florida was also diagnosed last month with dengue fever.

Read the Local 6 story of the 19-year-old diagnosed with dengue fever

Dengue fever is a viral disease transmitted by a breed of mosquito that is common in the southeastern United States. It is one of several mosquito-borne illnesses monitored by the Florida Department of Health.

There is no vaccine or antidote for dengue, and the Osceola Health Department is advising residents to take preventative measures against mosquitoes. Residents and visitors are encouraged to help lower mosquito populations by taking appropriate measures to guard against these diseases by practicing Drain and Cove:

DRAIN standing water:
• Drain water from garbage cans, buckets, pool covers, coolers, toys, flowerpots or any other containers where sprinkler or rainwater has collected.
• Discard old tires, drums, bottles, cans, pots and pans, broken appliances and
other items that aren't being used.
• Empty and clean birdbaths and pets' water bowls at least once or twice a week.
• Protect boats and vehicles from rain with tarps that don't accumulate water.
• Maintain swimming pools in good condition and appropriately chlorinated. Empty plastic swimming pools when not in use

COVER your skin with:
• CLOTHING - If you must be outside when mosquitoes are active, cover up. Wear shoes, socks, long pants and long sleeves.
• REPELLENT - Apply mosquito repellent to bare skin and clothing. Always use repellents according to the label. Repellents with 10-30% DEET, picaridin, oil of lemon eucalyptus, and IR3535 are effective.
• Use mosquito netting to protect children younger than 2 months old.

COVER doors and windows with screens:
• Keep mosquitoes out of your house. Repair broken screening on windows, doors, porches, and patios.

For More Information on dengue fever, go to www.cdc.gov/dengue. For mosquito disease activity across the state, go to http://myfloridaeh.com/medicine/arboviral/surveillance.htm.