SANFORD, Fla. -

Jailhouse phone calls show how George Zimmerman, the neighborhood watch leader charged with killing 17-year-old Trayvon Martin, instructed his wife to transfer money from bank accounts.

LISTEN:Call 1 | Call 2 | Call 3 | Call 4 | Call 5 | Call 6

READ: Transcript Call 1| Transcript Call 2 | Transcript 3 |Transcript 4| Transcript 5 | Transcript 6

WATCH: Legal analyst discusses case

The calls, released by the state on Monday, could play a crucial role in Zimmerman's second bond hearing, which is scheduled for June 29.

Zimmerman was released on $150,000 bond in April, several days after the phone calls took place. At his bond hearing, his wife, Shellie, testified that she didn't know how much money had been raised from a website created for his legal defense.

But four days before his April 20 bond hearing, Zimmerman spoke to Shellie Zimmerman on the phone as she was at the credit union and in the presence of a credit union representative, according to the calls. Through the phone, Zimmerman asked specific questions about how much money was in the account and directed the transfer of the funds from a PayPal account to his wife' account.

"Hey just in case, yeah, Ken told me uh about how much we have," George said. Zimmerman also spoke about Ken and the "Peter Pan", a code for his PayPal account. When George Zimmerman asked how much money they had in total, Shellie Zimmerman responded with "$155", which Zimmerman's attorney said that was code for $155,000.

"Though it was improper what they did to the judge and the judge stuck his neck out by letting him out on bond, there was no money taken no money hidden," O'Mara told Local 6.

Prosecutors say the calls show George and Shellie Zimmerman knew that roughly $135,000 had been raised by the site.

O'Mara, filed a motion on Monday for clarification regarding 145 of Zimmerman's 151 jail phone calls.

"The motion addressed 145 of the 151 phone calls from jail, and it is our contention that the calls are not only irrelevant to the charges against Mr. Zimmerman, but they could jeopardize friends and family of Mr. Zimmerman who are unrelated to the case," O'Mara wrote on his defense website, GZLegalCase.com

O'Mara seems particularly concerned with the witness statements being release from "Witness 9," as referred to in the motion. O'Mara wrote in the motion that witness 9's statement being released would, "reignite and possibly enhance the widespread hostility to Mr. Zimmerman." The court has agreed to consider the motion at the scheduled June 29 bond hearing.

O'Mara said the calls released on Monday were "relevant to the bond hearing" and didn't object to the release of those calls. In a call made April 12, Shellie Zimmerman said she called O'Mara.

“Ah, you’re so good,” said George Zimmerman, who then discussed resetting a password on one of his accounts. Zimmerman also asked his wife to make more transfers, after Shellie told him she had made four in the same day.

“Don’t worry, cutie,” said Shellie Zimmerman, who later added that her husband's website was crashing because of the amount of people logging in to show their support.

“That feels good … that there are people in America that care,” George Zimmerman said. “That is awesome. I need to talk to O’Mara about getting the word out because those people need to start vocalizing themselves.”

“After this is all over, you’re going to be able to just have a great life,” Shellie Zimmerman said.

“We will,” George Zimmerman replied.  “I’m excited.”

“Yeah, you should be.  You should be excited,” Shellie Zimmerman said.

“I wish you were here, of course,” she said.

“I will be,” he said.

“Isn’t it crazy how something like this just makes you put everything in perspective in life?” Shellie Zimmerman said.  “It’s amazing how insignificant the things we stress out over are.”

“I agree,” he said.

At one point, Shellie interrupted her husband while he was talking about taking medication, saying, “I see you on TV right now.”