CASSELBERRY, Fla. -

Casselberry police have released the police report on Wednesday in the shooting at a hair salon that killed three women and injured another last week.

The report sheds light into how determined 36-year-old Bradford Baumet was to shoot four women, including his ex-girlfriend, and kill three of them. Marcia Santiago, 44, the ex-girlfriend and Baumet's target, is in serious condition at Orlando Regional Medical Center. Gladys Cabrera, 52 ,a customer at the salon, Noelia Gonzalez-Brito, 28, an employee and salon owner Eugenia "Mari" Marte were killed.

Police said a tire iron was found inside the salon, which they believe was brought by Baumet to smash through the salon glass door if they tried to lock him out. According to the report, Baumet's 40-milimeter semi automatic hand gun used in the shooting, was also stolen.

Police said Baumet was outside of the salon ranting and raving and calling incessantly. Santiago's boss locked the doors and called the police. Police also released the 911 calls on Wednesday reporting the salon shooting.

"There's someone outside the door yelling at me, foul language and threatening me," the caller tells dispatchers.

Police said the harassment from Baumet resulting in Santiago going to a shelter for help. The day of the shooting, an injunction hearing was scheduled in the afternoon.

On Tuesday, Baumet was linked to a homicide investigation by Orlando police after police found 28-year-old Roberto Colon dead in his Gatlin Avenue apartment. Police say Baumet used Colon's Volkswagon Golf, which was spotted in McDonald's surveillance video, in the events leading up to the shooting. It's not clear if Baumet is responsible for Colon's death.

On Tuesday, surveillance video was released from the Metro PCS store located next to the salon. Baumet could be spotted in the video walking into the salon, gunshots being heard and then Baumet walked out of the salon, according to the video.

A group prayer will be held at the salon on Thursday at 11 a.m. Carol Wick of the Harbor House said abusers lashing out the people who show victims their support is becoming more common.

"We are seeing a growing trend nationally, not only in the workplace, but collateral victims," Wick said. "It's been going up for the last 5 years here in central Florida. This is not a trend that is not going away."