TALLAHASSEE, Fla. -

The Florida Legislature is sending a $74.5 billion state budget to Gov. Rick Scott.

The Florida Senate passed the budget by unanimous vote. The Florida House then approved the measure 106-11.

Flush with cash for the first time in seven years, the budget includes more than $1 billion for public schools.

It also includes a state worker pay raise and money for teacher pay raises.

Legislators included a 3 percent tuition hike for college and university students. Scott has remained steadfastly opposed to tuition hikes.

The budget does not include any federal aid to cover additional people under Medicaid, a key component of the federal health care overhaul.

But lawmakers kept intact a benefit that allows top state officials to pay very little for their own health insurance.

Flush with cash from the first time in seven years, the budget includes a more than $1 billion for public schools.

The budget also includes a pay raise for state workers and money for teacher pay raises.
Legislators did not raise taxes, but they have included in the budget a 3 percent tuition hike for college and university students. Scott has remained steadfastly opposed to tuition hikes.

The budget does not include any federal aid to cover additional people under Medicaid, a key component of the federal health care overhaul.

But lawmakers kept intact a benefit that allows top state officials to pay very little for their own health insurance.

A bill that would expand early voting days and sites is now heading to Gov. Rick Scott's desk.

The House and Senate approved the bill Friday, the last day of the legislative session. It would allow elections supervisors to hold up to 14 days of early voting instead of the current eight days. It also would expand sites where early voting can be held.

The bill (HB 7013) attempts to address problems with long lines and counting delays that once again made Florida the butt of late night television jokes during the presidential election.

The bill was passed two years after the Republican-led Legislature and Scott cut early voting from 14 days to eight.

Scott is also expected to sign a texting while driving bill. A teachers evaluations bill requires students not be assigned to teachers who have received an unsatisfactory rating in two consecutive years unless they get parental consent.

A bill also awaits for sports venues getting $13 million a year in sales tax rebates, enabling Major League Soccer clubs to find funding for stadium construction through a state sales tax rebate program.