SANFORD, Fla. -

The state's only eyewitness to the scuffle that preceded the shooting of Trayvon Martin wound up supporting George Zimmerman's claim he was pinned to the ground, straddled by a man in a position to harm him.

[Chat recap: Tony Pipitone in courtroom | READ: Exhibit list | State's evidence]

John Good confirmed Martin was atop Zimmerman during the crucial seconds prior to the gunshot. Good was a neighbor in the complex who saw some of the altercation and ran out during the struggle. Previously known as Witness 6, Good says he saw the fight before the gunshot with Martin was on top of Zimmerman. Other witnesses said they saw Zimmerman on top of Martin after the gunshot.

Good said he first heard initial "faint" noises before they seemed to get closer and closer. Good previously said he thought Martin was on top hitting Zimmerman with MMA-style punches but later changed his statement.

"It looked like a tussle," Good told prosecutor Bernie de la Rionda describing the fight. Good said he then yelled out "what's going on?" and told them to stop. He said he realized there were two people and saw dark clothing on top and light or red color on bottom.

Good said he never saw anyone being attacked that way during the fight between Zimmerman and Martin. Good said one person was straddling the other person, and the lighter-skinned person on the bottom was face-up.

Good then said it "looked like" Martin was on top, as if he were raining down blows on Zimmerman, but never saw one land. De la Rionda made sounds simulating punches or slamming and Good said he didn't hear those sounds, but heard someone saying "help." He then told the people he was calling the police.

When asked who was saying "help," Good said he couldn't be 100 percent sure that it was the person on the bottom.

De la Rionda then played Good's 911 call after the shot was fired. Records show Good called 911, connecting at 19:17:15, about 20 seconds after the gunshot. Good told de la Rionda that he heard the gunshot while he was dialing 911.

"I'm pretty sure the guy's dead out there. Holy s***!" Good said on the call.

Good said describing the fight as MMA-style first came to his mind because of what he had seen on TV. The straddling position is a common position you would see in mixed martial arts combat, Good said, adding that he didn't see the person on top slamming the person on the bottom's head on the concrete sidewalk, as Zimmerman claims Martin did.

During cross-examination, defense attorney and former Local 6 legal analyst Mark O'Mara had Good identify Martin and Zimmerman as the people on the top and bottom, respectively.

"The person who you now know to be Trayvon Martin was on top correct?" O'Mara asked. "Correct," Good answered.

"And he was the one reigning blows down on the person on the bottom, George Zimmerman?" O'Mara asked.

"Right. That's what it looked like," Good said.

Good had only described the color of the clothing during the state's questioning.

O'Mara showed Good a picture of Zimmerman's jacket to identify if it was Zimmerman on the bottom. Good said he couldn't say for certain that's what he saw, but says it was "definitely a redder color." Good was then shown the 7-Eleven picture of Mrtin confirming the outerwear was the same color as what was worn by the person on top in the scuffle.

O'Mara also questioned Good about the timing of when he first heard the altercation. O'Mara asked Good where the noises of the struggle first originated, but Good refused to speculate.

"It was only a few seconds before that gun shot that you were outside looking at the two individuals in the ground and pound position?" O'Mara asked. "Correct," Good replied.

O'Mara then demonstrated how the straddle position would look in the middle of the courtroom and had Good confirm the person on top looked like that. He then had Good describe the movements by the person on top.

"Arm movements were going downward," Good said. "Couldn't 100 percent say they were strikes."

O'Mara then asked what "ground and pound"-- what Good described the position as-- means. Good said it meant the person on top was the "dominant" position, but he didn't see punches being thrown.

Good then said it "looked like" Martin was on top, agreeing that he was raining down blows on Zimmerman. As O'Mara asked about who Good thought was screaming, Good said "rationally thinking, I would think" the man on the bottom was screaming for help. Good's account appears to be consistent with Zimmerman's account of what happened during the altercation.

O'Mara played the 911 call with the screams after Good previously said the screams on the recording sounded different than what he had heard. O'Mara appears to be trying to show audio recording of the scream isn't an accurate representation of sound.

Good said he couldn't verify the screams on the 911 call match up with the exact same screams he heard. He later told O'Mara that he thought the screams were Zimmerman but that was "his opinion."