71ºF

Ride out the apocalypse in this $15 million fortress

Built to 'live to die another day'

The Rice House in Alpharetta, Georgia, is a 36,000-square-foot, fortified mega-mansion built to withstand every threat up to and including nuclear war. (thericehouseatlanta.com)

Looking for the ultimate protection from the apocalypse? Or maybe you're just paranoid?

Either way, consider a move to Alpharetta, Georgia, where a 36,000-square-foot mega-mansion built to withstand every threat up to and including nuclear war is back on the market.

Known as the Rice House, this "extraordinary presidential compound" 30 minutes from Atlanta was designed by Al Corbi, a security expert who spent 23 years making federal government buildings as safe and secure as possible.

Corbi is founder and president of SAFE, which stands for Strategically Armored and Fortified Environment. His security mantra is self-reliance - the ability to survive while those left to their own pathetic devices succumb to chaos.

And survive you almost certainly will. 

In addition to the eight bedrooms and 15 baths, the bowling alley, the infinity pool and the indoor gun range, the Rice House features a 15,000-square-foot fortified bunker and a command center outfitted with SAFE's "Situational Awareness and Control (SAC) system." The property has its own power sources, including a solar array, and drinking water can be tapped from three artesian wells.

There are hidden exits, anti-ballistic doors and walls that can withstand a bomb blast and man traps designed to "isolate intruders in a strategic area" of the property. The house has a four-car garage, as well as a 5,000-square-foot "car vault" with room for 30 vehicles that is concealed by a waterfall.

Inspired by the Acropolis in Athens, the Rice House took six years and $30 million to build, and there is still plenty of work left to be done on the inside. That was by design, apparently. The current owner left the interior largely unfinished, a blank slate that "purposely awaits final personalization." 

Originally listed in August 2016 for $17.5 million, the price has been reduced to $14.7 million