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Want to go to space? NASA app puts you in front of space telescope's images

Spitzer celebrates 15 years of discoveries on Aug. 25

NASA introduced a new selfie app to celebrate the Spitzer Space Telescope's 15th year of discoveries. (Image: NASA Selfie App)
NASA introduced a new selfie app to celebrate the Spitzer Space Telescope's 15th year of discoveries. (Image: NASA Selfie App)


NASA's space telescope Spitzer has captured stunning images of galaxies, dying stars, newborn stars and more for the last 15 years, and to celebrate the spacecraft's anniversary, NASA released a new app that puts you in the other-worldly images captured by Spitzer, Hubble and Chandra space telescopes.

The Spitzer observatory, named for astrophysicist Lyman Spitzer Jr., launched from Cape Canaveral in 2003 and follows Earth in a heliocentric orbit, studying objects in our solar system and deep into the universe.

With NASA's new free app for Android and IOS devices, users can snap a selfie and be instantly transported light-years away --in a NASA spacesuit-- into Spitzer's most well-known images. Each image includes some information about what's in it and which space telescope it was taken by. The images include the the stellar winds from star Zeta Ophiuchi and the heated dust swirls around the Milky Way's galactic core.

[Click through the gallery below to see some of Spitzer's images]

NASA's next in-space observatory, the James Webb Space Telescope, is slated to launch in 2021, but has faced years of delays.

The $8 billion telescope will be more powerful than NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope and will live more than 1 million miles from Earth to better observe deep space. The 21-foot diameter infrared telescope will observe rare astronomical events, including the birth of stars and galaxies, and find planets outside our solar system, known as exoplanets.

James Webb will be the most powerful space telescope yet.


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