Central Floridians take part in #BlackOutTuesday as George Floyd protests continue

Locals visit black-owned businesses to show support

Central Floridians take part in #BlackOutTuesday as George Floyd protests continue
Central Floridians take part in #BlackOutTuesday as George Floyd protests continue

ORLANDO, Fla. – Thousands of people all over the country, including in Central Florida, are taking part in what’s called #BlackOutTuesday.

It's an effort done to show support for George Floyd by not posting on social media and many are also supporting black businesses.

It’s happening at a time where many businesses say it’s most needed in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Torri Porter chose to support the movement by having lunch at Jesse’s Rib Shack in Orlando.

“To make sure that they know that we have their back, and that we’re going to make sure that they thrive in our communities,” Porter said.

[RELATED: Black-owned restaurants you can support in Orlando | George Floyd’s death: Here’s 5 ways you can take action]

She said it’s her way of showing support against racial inequality.

“For me not being able to go out to rallies, my way of supporting us is going out right and supporting our black communities,” Porter said.

Miles Mulrain took part as well.

“When we’re talking about highlighting and change, we need to highlight the ones who are doing good,” Mulrain said.

He’s taken part in several protests across Orlando and is calling for justice for Floyd, a black man who died after an officer pinned his knee on his neck. He’s also calling for more police accountability.

“We’re tired of police brutality, we’re tired of losing black people to all of this injustice,” Mulrain said. “We want to see Orange County and the city of Orlando take new strategies, announce a new program, make some community liaison, put some partners in place to show that you really care about the community.”

30 demonstrators arrested Sunday as protests over George Floyd’s death continue, Orlando police chief says
30 demonstrators arrested Sunday as protests over George Floyd’s death continue, Orlando police chief says

As a black man and the father of a 4-year-son, Mulrain told News 6 the past few days have been tough.

“I shouldn’t have to fear for him from the people who are supposed to be protecting us,” Mulrain said.

James Awolaru owns Boughi Clothing in Pine Hills. He’s still trying to support his family and bounce back after being closed for weeks.

“I want to stay in business, I want to serve the community but we need help. We need local support,” Awolaru said. “I don’t want to have to shut down. So we need everybody.”

[READ MORE: Florida trooper breaks protest line to hug woman | Medical examiner: Floyd’s heart stopped while restrained]

Jamal Jackson, who owns Jesse’s Rib Shack in Orlando, agreed that he support is needed now more than ever.

“To be honest, we really needed it right now. During these times right now, going through COVID,” Jackson said.

Many supporters say they don’t support looting, but they understand the frustration. They’re encouraging people to peacefully protest and use that same energy to support black businesses.


About the Author:

Jerry Askin is an Atlanta native who came to News 6 in March 2018 with an extensive background in breaking news.