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COVID-19 cases rise among children as schools reopen

Medical experts say, it still looks like severe symptoms are rare in kids

In this photo posted on Twitter, students crowd a hallway, Tuesday, Aug. 4, 2020, at North Paulding High School in Dallas, Ga.  The Georgia high school student says she has been suspended for five days because of photos of crowded conditions that she provided to The Associated Press and other news organizations. Hannah Watters, a 15-year-old sophomore at North Paulding High School, says she and her family view the suspension as overly harsh and are appealing it. (Twitter via AP, File)
In this photo posted on Twitter, students crowd a hallway, Tuesday, Aug. 4, 2020, at North Paulding High School in Dallas, Ga. The Georgia high school student says she has been suspended for five days because of photos of crowded conditions that she provided to The Associated Press and other news organizations. Hannah Watters, a 15-year-old sophomore at North Paulding High School, says she and her family view the suspension as overly harsh and are appealing it. (Twitter via AP, File)

How does COVID-19 affect kids? It's a question medical experts are still working to answer.

As the total number of cases ticks up, it makes sense to see more and more kids getting sick too.

But now there are new studies that show kids may be more likely to spread the virus.

It's no wonder so many parents are uneasy about sending their kids back to the classroom.

Even with coronavirus cases still spreading across the United States, President Trump once again insisting the pandemic will end soon.

"I think at the end of a fairly short period of time, you're going to be in very, very good shape all over our country," Trump said.

But according to top researchers, the disease is here to stay.

"What it has clearly demonstrated is, you take the pressure off the virus, the virus bounces back. This virus is proving exceptionally difficult to stop," World Health Organization Executive Director Dr. Mike Ryan said.

In Georgia, where a viral photo of a crowded high school hallway was taken just last week, Gov. Brian Kemp rejected a mask mandate at public schools.

"I think, quite honestly, this week went real well other than a couple of virtual photos," Kemp said.

Kemp saying this despite outbreaks in several Georgia school districts sending hundreds of students and teachers into quarantine.

While many parents debate whether to send their children back to the classroom or use online learning.

The American Academy of Pediatrics reported nearly 180,000 new cases in children within the past month.

That's a 90% increase over four weeks.

When asked about the study, President Trump said schools should still reopen for in-person instruction.

"They may have, as you would call it a case, it maybe a case, but it's also a case where there's a tiny -- it's a tiny fraction of death, tiny fraction, and they get better very quickly. I think that for the most part, they do very well. I mean, they don't get very sick. They don't catch it easily," Trump said.

But health experts say this isn't totally true.

“It’s not fair to say that this virus is completely benign in children. we’ve had 90 deaths in children in the U.S. Yes, it’s much less -- it’s much less severe than it is in adults, particularly older adults, but we all have to take this virus seriously, including taking care of our children,” Dr. Sean O’Leary, vice-chair, American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Infectious Diseases said.

As some college students move back to campus, the future of football is in question.

Several sports outlets reporting the power five conferences are discussing *postponing* the fall season.

With the academic year already underway for many students, Dr. Anthony Fauci says one public health tool is key for classrooms to reopen safely.

"I feel that universal wearing of masks is one of five or six things that are very important in preventing the upsurge of infection and in turning around the infections that we are seeing surging," Fauci said.

Medical experts say, as of now, it still looks like severe symptoms from COVID-19 are rare in kids.