87ºF

Is Florida winter over? Here’s what the next few weeks look like

Temperatures running at least 10 degrees above average in Central Florida

FILE - This May 21, 2008, file photo shows the main beach at Caladesi Island State Park, a barrier island along the Gulf of Mexico, on Florida's West Coast in Dunedin. Scientists say that half of the world's sandy beached are at risk of disappearing by the end of the century if climate changes continues unchecked. Researchers at the European Union's Joint Research Center in Ispra, Italy, used satellite images to track the way beaches changed over the past 30 years and project how global warming might affect them in the future. (AP Photo/Craig Litten, File)
FILE - This May 21, 2008, file photo shows the main beach at Caladesi Island State Park, a barrier island along the Gulf of Mexico, on Florida's West Coast in Dunedin. Scientists say that half of the world's sandy beached are at risk of disappearing by the end of the century if climate changes continues unchecked. Researchers at the European Union's Joint Research Center in Ispra, Italy, used satellite images to track the way beaches changed over the past 30 years and project how global warming might affect them in the future. (AP Photo/Craig Litten, File) (Copyright 2019 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.)

ORLANDO, Fla.- – Was winter even a thing this year?

Yes, spring officially starts March 19, but will Central Florida see any cooler temperatures before the summer sizzle strikes?

Temperatures have already reached the 90s across Florida, and it’s not even April. The first 90-degree day in Orlando came about a month ahead of schedule, and more potentially record-breaking heat is to come this weekend.

Florida is typically measured in two seasons: wet and dry.

The start of the wet season is when cold fronts stop coming and the real Florida heat and humidity start to build. The wet season typically begins in late May and runs through mid-to-late October. The summer sea breezes begin providing the region with the nearly daily rain and storms. The sea-breeze season really ramps up in the middle of summer.

The dry season, marked by the start of cold fronts routinely crossing Central Florida, has lived up to its name of late. All of Central Florida is running 1 to 1.5 inches below the normal amount of rainfall in March.

So, is this the end of winter and the dry season and the start of the oppressive heat?

Winter may done, but it’s not quite the end of the dry season.

While we may see a weak sea breeze or two fire up in the week ahead, there are indications toward the end of March that more cold fronts will visit. The fronts would supply Central Florida with relatively cooler, less humid air.

Keep in mind, average high temperatures by the end of March are around 80 degrees, so cooler air would put us in the 70s.


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