'I have done a bad thing': Accused Kissimmee cop killer cried after arrest

New details released in double fatal shooting

By Adrienne Cutway - Web Editor

KISSIMMEE, Fla. - A man accused of fatally shooting two Kissimmee police officers Friday night first resisted and reached for a gun during his arrest, then later cried to authorities and begged to be killed, according to the Osceola County Sheriff's Office.

Newly released affidavits shed more light on the shooting in Kissimmee Friday night, which left Officer Matthew Baxter and Sgt. Sam Howard dead.

Baxter met with three men on Palmway and Cypress Streets in Kissimmee at 9:28 p.m. then requested back up from a supervisor moments later. Howard arrived to assist at 9:48 p.m. Minutes later, at 9:52 p.m., dispatch was advised of shots fired.

One of the first responding deputies found both men with gunshot wounds to their heads. They were both taken to Osceola Regional Medical Center, where Baxter died that same night and Howard died the next afternoon.

Two men contacted deputies shortly before 10 p.m. in connection with the shooting.

One man told authorities he had nothing to do with it and wanted his hands to be tested for gunshot residue. The second man told authorities he had a video of the moments leading up to the shooting, according to the affidavit.

That video showed a man later identified as suspect Everett Glenn Miller, 45, telling Baxter that he should not have stopped him because he was not driving the blue Kia also seen in the video, the report said. Miller was requesting a sergeant respond to the area.

The video ends as Miller was walking to the trunk of the Kia. The witness told deputies he and the other man walked away because the officer told them to leave the area.

Moments later they heard gunshots, according to the affidavit.

A woman who was watching TV at her home nearby said she heard three gunshots and looked out her door moments later to see Miller speeding away in his sedan and two officers lying in the street, bleeding, the report said.

At 10:23 p.m., authorities received a call from the manager at Roscoe's Bar in Kissimmee reporting a suspicious man, later identified as Miller, who refused to leave, deputies said.

Miller disobeyed the commands from deputies to get up and leave the bar, the report said. He yelled profanities at them and shouted "I didn't do anything," according to the report.

Deputies said Miller yanked his arm away and turned his body away from them as they tried to get him off his chair.

A deputy pinned Miller to the ground as he was attempting to reach for his waistband, where deputies later found a 9 mm handgun, according to the affidavit. Deputies said a .22 caliber Derringer with one live round and four spent shell casings was found in Miller's pocket.

"I'm innocent. I didn't do it. I'm a veteran," Miller shouted during his arrest.

A deputy described Miller as "relentless" in his efforts to resist, adding that a detective had to deliver three to five knee spikes to Miller's outer left thigh to get him to comply, the report said.

Once at the police station, Miller at first refused to speak to authorities without his attorney present. Shortly thereafter, he requested a deputy to come adjust his handcuffs.

The deputy said Miller started to cry, telling the deputy he didn't want to live and he wanted the deputy to kill him, the report said. The deputy told him no one at the police station would kill him.

"I have done a bad thing," Miller replied, according to the report. 

Miller's sister told deputies that she received a call that night from an old friend who said he ran into Miller at Roscoe's Bar and he was "acting crazy" claiming he just shot two police officers, deputies said. 

Miller is charged with premeditated murder, carrying a concealed weapon and resisting arrest without violence. He's being held at the Osceola County Jail without bond.

A Kissimmee Police Department spokeswoman said more charges will definitely be filed against Miller.

Regeus Brinson said Miller is a good man but has struggled with mental health issues since he left the U.S. Marine Corps in 2010.

"Honestly talking to Glen he was real skittish, like I said, we would talk every day and from what I gather and from the way things happened, I really think that the situation he was in was putting him in enough stress where he reverted back to his military days," Brinson said.

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