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5 ways children can contact Santa Claus

Easier than ever to get Christmas list to Santa in digital age

Has your child already started their Christmas list for Santa?

While some children are afraid to deliver the list personally to Santa, there are other ways to communicate with him.

With the help of technology, it’s now easier than ever to deliver the list to the man in red who lives at the North Pole.

Don’t worry, you can still go the traditional route of writing letters, but it may also be fun to give a video call a try.

Write letters to Santa and get postmarked letter back from the North Pole

The U.S. Postal Service brings holiday cheer to children when they write letters to Santa. The process isn’t as easy as just sending in the letter, so pay attention to the instructions below.

USPS.com instructions:

  • Have the child write a letter to Santa and place it in an envelope addressed to: Santa Claus, North Pole.
  • Write a personalized response to the child's letter and sign it "From Santa."
  • Insert both letters into an envelope, and address it to the child.
  • Add the return address: SANTA, NORTH POLE, to the envelope.
  • Ensure a First-Class Mail stamp is affixed to the envelope.
  • Place the complete envelope into a larger envelope, with appropriate postage, and address it to:

Don’t delay, though, as USPS recommends sending letters by Dec. 7 so they can reach Alaska by Dec. 14. More information can be found here.

Call from Santa

Video Call Santa – Simply download the Video Call with Santa app and your child can talk to Santa in a Facetime or Skype type call. Call Saint Nick immediately or schedule the call for later. Once on the line, Santa asks your child their name, if they’ve been good and what’s on their wish list. This is a must-try as you watch your child’s face light up.

DialMyCalls.com – Get a customizable call from Santa at DialMyCalls.com. You can select your child’s name and choose from seven different messages for your child to hear. The call can be scheduled for an exact date and time. For more information, click here.

ChristmasDialer.com – Want Santa to call right away? Put in your phone number, choose between Santa and an elf and pick a message of your choice. Your phone will ring immediately. Get more information here.

Email Santa

Even though Santa may be 1,748 years old, he’s computer savvy and there are several ways your children can email the jolly old fellow, according to lifewire.com.

EmailSanta.com – This interactive site offers your child a fun experience where they can choose a stamp, answer a few questions and their email is off to Santa. He’s such a quick typist, that you receive an immediate response.

NorthPole.com – There’s much more to this site besides sending Santa an email. There are games, stories and karaoke. You must create a free account before you write your letter or send postcards from the site.

Video Letter from Santa

Parents, you can surprise your child with a personalized video to Santa. At PortableNorthPole.com, you can get a free, personalized video letter that includes charming touches like the child’s wish list, if they’ve been good and up to three images of the child you submit. Watch as your child’s face lights up watching Santa Claus talk about them.

Leave Santa a message

While your child won’t speak directly to Santa, they are greeted by his jolly message before being able to leave him a message in turn. Kids can share what they want for Christmas in a message. If you call from a mobile phone, a recording of the message will be texted to you. Click here for more information.

NORAD Santa Tracker

While you can’t communicate with Santa on NORAD Santa Tracker, kids can get “real-time” information to track Santa as he delivers presents all around the world starting Dec. 1. The site also features videos, a Christmas countdown, cookie counter and a reading of “The Night Before Christmas.”

And if these ideas are too modern for your traditional tastes, hop on down to your local mall and tell Saint Nick in person what you’d like for Christmas.


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