No travel needed: Louvre puts its collection online

Less than 3 million people visited the museum in 2020

The almost empty courtyard of the Louvre museum is pictured Wednesday, Oct.14, 2020 in Paris. French President Emmanuel Macron is giving a nationally televised interview Wednesday night to speak about the virus, his first in months. French media reports say Macron will also step up efforts on social media to press the need for virus protections among young people. (AP Photo/Lewis Joly)
The almost empty courtyard of the Louvre museum is pictured Wednesday, Oct.14, 2020 in Paris. French President Emmanuel Macron is giving a nationally televised interview Wednesday night to speak about the virus, his first in months. French media reports say Macron will also step up efforts on social media to press the need for virus protections among young people. (AP Photo/Lewis Joly) (Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved)

This might make the Mona Lisa smile.

Her home, the Louvre, is going virtual.

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The arguably most famous museum in the world is taking its collection online for all to see. That means no passport is required to check out masterpieces like the Venus de Milo.

There’s no doubt the global coronavirus pandemic played a role in creating a “renaissance,” if you will, for the Parisian museum.

Less than 3 million people wandered the spacious halls in 2020, down from nearly 10 million in 2019.

But now, 480,000 plus pieces of art will be on display virtually on the museum’s website.

Louvre officials said the website is now more user-friendly and immersive.

You can even follow an interactive map of the exhibits, which is a close second to being there in person.

Viewing the art is free but images can’t be downloaded or shared.