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Ex-Seminole County tax collector Joel Greenberg seeks delay in sentencing

Greenberg faces minimum of 12 years in prison

ORLANDO, Fla. – Former Seminole County tax collector Joel Greenberg is asking a judge to postpone his sentencing on child sex trafficking and other criminal charges until March 2022 so he can continue cooperating with federal authorities on other investigations, according to a newly filed court motion.

As part of a plea agreement signed in May, Greenberg admitted to trafficking a minor for sex, identity theft, wire fraud and stalking.

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In exchange for prosecutors dropping dozens of other criminal charges, Greenberg agreed to offer “substantial assistance” with other government investigations and prosecutions.

Greenberg faces a mandatory minimum of 12 years in prison but could be sentenced to a significantly longer incarceration, depending on his level of cooperation.

The former tax collector was originally scheduled to be sentenced Aug. 19 but convinced a judge to postpone it until Nov. 19 due to his inability to complete his cooperation with the government by that date. 

On Tuesday, Greenberg’s attorney asked the judge to postpone his client’s sentencing once again.

“Pursuant to his plea agreement with the Government, Mr. Greenberg has been cooperating with the Government and has participated in a series of proffers,” wrote attorney Fritz Scheller.  “Said cooperation, which could impact his ultimate sentence, cannot be completed prior to the time of his sentencing.”

Federal prosecutors do not oppose Greenberg’s request to delay sentencing until March, said Scheller, noting that Greenberg’s ongoing cooperation “involves sensitive matters concerning ongoing investigations.”


About the Author:

Emmy Award-winning investigative reporter Mike DeForest has been covering Central Florida news for more than two decades. Mike joined News 6 just as Florida officials began counting hanging chads in the aftermath of the 2000 presidential election. Since then, he has covered some of the biggest news events in Central Florida.