‘Little margin for error:’ NASA faces pressure over Artemis mission

Ken Kremer, of Space UpClose, joins News 6′s Justin Warmoth on ‘The Weekly’

NASA on Monday was forced to scrub the launch of the Artemis I mission, a consequential and long overdue test flight.

ORLANDO, Fla. – NASA on Monday was forced to scrub the launch of the Artemis I mission, a consequential and long overdue test flight.

The Space Launch System, or SLS, was ready to take off from Kennedy Space Center in what would have been the first major step for the space agency’s Artemis program that aims to one day return astronauts to the moon. Engine issues prevented the launch, however, and as of Monday, the next possible launch attempt would be Friday.

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Ken Kremer, of Space UpClose, joined anchor Justin Warmoth on “The Weekly” this past Sunday to preview the mission and the pressure NASA faces to make sure everything goes smoothly. Kremer is a research chemist, space/science journalist, photographer, speaker the and founder/managing editor of Space UpClose website reporting up close on all things related to NASA and Space Exploration.

“They’re absolutely feeling the pressure and it has to go well,” Kremer said. “There’s very little margin for error. Just about everything has to go well.”

Here Kremer’s full explanation in the video player above.

Hundreds of thousands of tourists flocked to the Space Coast to witness the historic liftoff only to find out the launch was scrubbed just minutes into a two-hour window.

The Space Launch System, or SLS, is finally ready to take off from Kennedy Space Center in what will be the first major step for the space agency’s Artemis program that aims to one day return astronauts to the lunar surface. Ken Kremer with Space UpClose joined anchor Justin Warmoth on “The Weekly” to preview the mission and the pressure NASA faces to make sure everything goes smoothly.

Kremer said when it does go up, he expects it to be similar to a space shuttle launch.

“The SLS is the most powerful rocket in the world,” Kremer said. “It’s about 15-20% more powerful than Apollo and the space shuttle, so it’s that class of vehicle. That class is like four times the Falcon 9.”

Atop of the SLS will be an unpiloted crew capsule that will embark on a 42-day voyage around the moon, testing numerous features before astronauts climb aboard.

Watch the full interview in the video player above.


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About the Author:

Justin Warmoth joined News 6 in February 2013 as our Brevard County reporter. In March of 2016, after anchoring the weekend mornings since August of 2015, Justin was promoted to weekday morning anchor. You can catch him Monday through Friday mornings from 5-7 a.m. and at noon.