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FBI links men's rights lawyer to N.J., California killings

New York State Police block off a road near the scene where the body of Roy Den Hollander was found on Monday, July 20, 2020 near Livingston Manor, N.Y. Hollander, a self-described "anti-feminist" lawyer found dead in the Catskills of an apparent self-inflicted gunshot wound, is being investigated as the possible gunman in the shooting of a federal judge's family in New Jersey. (Jim Sabastian/The Times Herald-Record via AP)
New York State Police block off a road near the scene where the body of Roy Den Hollander was found on Monday, July 20, 2020 near Livingston Manor, N.Y. Hollander, a self-described "anti-feminist" lawyer found dead in the Catskills of an apparent self-inflicted gunshot wound, is being investigated as the possible gunman in the shooting of a federal judge's family in New Jersey. (Jim Sabastian/The Times Herald-Record via AP)

LOS ANGELES – Federal investigators have unspecified evidence linking the killing of a men's rights lawyer in California to the suspect in the ambush shooting of a federal judge’s family in New Jersey, authorities said Wednesday.

The evidence allegedly connects Roy Den Hollander, another men's rights attorney who was found dead of a self-inflicted gunshot wound the day after an attack that killed the judge’s son and wounded her husband, to the death of Marc Angelucci in San Bernardino County, California.

FBI officials in Newark, New Jersey, on Wednesday would not describe the evidence or explain how it ties into the two cases.

Angelucci was shot to death at his home on July 11.

The FBI says Den Hollander was the “primary subject in the attack” Sunday at the home of U.S. District Judge Esther Salas in North Brunswick, New Jersey, where 20-year-old Daniel Anderl was killed and his father, Mark Anderl, 63, was wounded.

Salas, 51, was in another part of the house and was unharmed. Den Hollander was found dead Monday in Sullivan County, New York.

In both attacks, the suspect appeared to pose as a delivery driver, according to a law enforcement official. The official could not discuss an ongoing investigation publicly and spoke to the AP on condition of anonymity.

Investigators found items in Den Hollander's possession that prompted concerns about whether he had targeted, or planned to target, other people. The items included a photograph of New York Chief Judge Janet DiFiore and the address of a state appeals courthouse, a state court spokesperson said.