How redistricting changed who Central Florida voters choose for Congress

Several districts have shifted boundaries

A Florida Supreme Court ruling will let this congressional redistricting map approved by Gov. DeSantis stand, at least through 2022. (State of Florida)

ORLANDO, Fla. – When voters go to the polls in August and November, they may notice a change in their congressional candidates and districts.

Every 10 years, states redraw the districts for representatives at all levels of government based on U.S. Census data, in a process called redistricting. Based on those population numbers, Florida gained another U.S. House district for 2022 — from 27 representatives to 28.

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In Florida, districts are supposed to be compact and representative of the demographics of the state, per the Fair Districts amendments passed by voters in 2010. They are also not meant to be drawn to benefit one political party over another.

When Florida’s Republican-led legislature chose a new congressional map, which was drawn by Gov. DeSantis’ office, they changed several districts in the Central Florida area.

Slide the bar in between the two maps below to see the difference between the congressional districts in 2020 and the congressional districts in 2022.

The first thing to notice is that voters in northwest Marion County who may have been in U.S. House District 2 are now in U.S. House District 3, represented by Republican Kat Cammack.

The east side of Marion County and the northern part of Lake County may now find themselves in U.S. House District 6, represented by Republican Michael Waltz.

Meanwhile, you’ll notice southern Volusia County is now no longer in U.S. House District 6. Those voters are now part of House District 7. In fact, District 7 has undergone a very drastic change.

Lets take a closer look at the districts that make up Metro Orlando.

U.S. House District 7, currently represented by Democrat Stephanie Murphy, used to encompass Seminole County and a chunk of Orange County that extended down into Orlando. This made the district more of a “swing district,” a more even mix of Republican and Democratic voters, and gave a Democrat a chance.

The new District 7 now encompasses more of the Republican voters of Volusia County and none of Orange County’s Democrats. While it is still a swing district, it is very likely this district will become a Republican one in 2022, according to polling experts.

Murphy had already decided to retire before the district was redrawn.

That part of Orange County that was in District 7 is now part of District 10. So is part of District 9. District 10, currently represented by Democrat Val Demings (who is leaving the U.S. House to run for U.S. Senate), used to encompass most of west Orange County. Now it stretches across the center of the county, and its western boundary has shifted east.

Everything from Zellwood down to Disney World, including the growing Horizons West area, is in District 11, which is represented by Republican Daniel Webster.

District 11′s western boundary has also shifted, ending at Sumter County’s western boundary.

This also takes all of the booming Four Corners area out of District 15, which has moved west. It only represents a part of western Polk County. The rest of Polk County is now represented by House District 18.

Want to see what congressional district you’re in now?

Check out the full 2022 congressional map and use the zoom-in tool on the left of the map to find where you live.

The new congressional map drawn by the Florida Legislature is currently being litigated by the coalition that pushed the Fair Districts amendments, saying the map is unconstitutional because it dilutes districts that were heavily represented by minorities, like District 10.

The Florida Supreme Court, however, refused to block the map until the issue has been fully settled by the courts, so for now the map and the newly-drawn districts will stand for 2022.

Meanwhile, you can see the new maps for the Florida House of Representative districts HERE, and the new Florida Senate districts HERE.

Redistricting may also mean that your Election Day polling precinct has changed. To find your polling precinct, click on the links for your county on the map below.

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About the Author:

Christie joined the ClickOrlando team in November 2021.