Retirement age? Super Bowl coaches just getting started

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This combination of file photos shows Kansas City Chiefs head coach Andy Reid, left, and Tampa Bay Buccaneers head coach Bruce Arians during NFL football games. Theres no retirement age in the NFL, and thats a good thing for Super Bowl-bound Kansas City and Tampa Bay. Andy Reid and Bruce Arians are two of the leagues five oldest coaches. Reid is closing in on 63; Arians turned 68 last October. They have a combined 55 years of NFL experience and spent nearly another three decades working at the college level. (AP Photo/File)

There’s no retirement age in the NFL, and that’s a good thing for Super Bowl-bound Kansas City and Tampa Bay.

Andy Reid and Bruce Arians are two of the league’s five oldest coaches. Reid is closing in on 63; Arians turned 68 last October. They have a combined 55 years of NFL experience and spent nearly another three decades working at the college level.

Neither seems close to calling it a career. Instead, they’re showing that bald heads and gray facial hair might be a better choice than young and spry at football’s most important leadership position. These guys might just be getting started, too.

Reid signed a six-year contract extension in November that could keep him with the Chiefs through 2025. Arians told a Tampa radio station Wednesday he plans to return in 2021 even if the Buccaneers beat Kansas City at home in the Super Bowl on Feb. 7. Arians was asked on WDAE-FM whether he would “ride off into the sunset” with a victory.

“Hell, no!” he said. “I’m going for two. If the (owners) will have me back, I’ll be back.”

Reid, who ranks fifth on the NFL wins list with 238, is in the midst of his eighth season in Kansas City after a long tenure in Philadelphia. He took over a team that was 2-14 before his arrival and built a consistent winner, one that has reached new heights under Super Bowl MVP quarterback Patrick Mahomes.

“A guy like Patrick will keep you very, very young,” Arians joked.

Reid and the Chiefs are trying to become the first team in 16 years to win consecutive Super Bowls, joining an exclusive list of dynasties that includes Green Bay (1967-68), Miami (’72-73), Pittsburgh (’75-76, ’79-80), San Francisco (’89-90), Dallas (’92-93), Denver (’98-99) and New England (2003-04).