75ºF

Two named storms in the Atlantic, neither pose a local threat

Josephine and Kyle expected to weaken this weekend

Josephine and Kyle in the Atlantic. Neither pose a threat to the U.S.
Josephine and Kyle in the Atlantic. Neither pose a threat to the U.S.

ORLANDO, Fla.- – If you blinked, you missed the naming of Tropical Storm Kyle Friday. Kyle developed as an area of low pressure moved off of the Carolina coast and over the open, warm waters of the Gulf Stream. Kyle continued the record-breaking pace for storm formation becoming the earliest “K” storm on record. It beat out Katrina from 2005.

While we continue to outpace the hyperactive season of 2005, 2020 is nowhere close to ‘05′s intensity. Through the “K” storm in 2005 there were already 4 hurricanes with 3 of those being major. Emily and Katrina reached category 5 status.

Kyle is moving away from the U.S. and will weaken quickly
Kyle is moving away from the U.S. and will weaken quickly

Kyle is moving away from the U.S, and is expected to weaken quickly over the cooler waters of the North Atlantic.

Tropical Storm Josephine is still chugging away in the Southern Atlantic, but will soon encounter wind shear and more dry air will fall apart as it makes a turn towards Bermuda.

Josephine will weakenover the weekend as it encounters shear and dry air. Josephine poses no threat to the U.S.
Josephine will weakenover the weekend as it encounters shear and dry air. Josephine poses no threat to the U.S.

Dry air continues to dominate the Atlantic for now, but the basin could become more favorable in the next 7-14 days.


About the Author: