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App started by UCF student looks to help stop date rape

'Yes Means Yes' app designed after California law requires college students to say yes before sex

ORLANDO, Fla. – Could an app on your phone help stop date rape?

The latest software creation called "Yes Means Yes" started in Orlando by University of Central Florida student Jordan Smith after what happened in the Treon Harris or Jameis Winston case.

It was designed after the new law in California that requires college students to say yes before sex.

"A defense attorney can say he attempted to get consent with this app," said Smith.

Here's the idea: You go out, meet someone and you both decide to go home together. Both parties pull out their phones, open up the app and give legal consent before sex.

While some women might use the app, they also fear it could be used the wrong way.

Sam Safdari said she worried a man might say, "'Here's legal evidence, she said yes.' But it also depends on when it happened when she said yes."

"I would use it, but only for the purpose that it would bring up that conversation before anything happened," said Kerry Stein.

Local 6 legal analyst Eric Dubois said the app creates a lot of questions, like, "Who did the consent? Was the person intoxicated when they consented? What stage of the evening did they verbally consent or withdraw that consent? What did they consent to?"

Currently, there's no way to revoke consent on the app once you give it.

Dubois thinks the app could make it harder to solve date rapes by adding another layer of evidence to sort through.

"It's not legally binding, as in, it's not a get out of jail free card. In most sexual assault cases, it's always a he said/she said. On the simplest level: The awareness factor. It needs to be a culture change," said Smith.

All the information contained in the app is stored on a third party server and can only be released with a subpoena, said Smith, who went on to say the app is free and could be available on Apple products in the next week.