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Here’s when early voting will take place in Central Florida counties

Supervisor of Election Offices prepare for Aug. 18 primary

ORLANDO, Fla. – Floridians planning to vote in local primary elections can cast their ballots early in the interest of avoiding crowds at the polls.

As Florida continues to report thousands of new coronavirus cases daily, Supervisor of Elections are suggesting people request a vote-by-mail ballot. For those who enjoy the traditional stroll to the polls, election experts are pointing to early voting days as a viable option for voters to make sure their voices are heard while mitigating any exposure to COVID-19.

[RELATED: Things to know about voting in Central Florida during the coronavirus pandemic]

There’s a number of races across Central Florida, so make sure to brush up on your sample ballots and check out the candidates running for office using this link. You can also check your voter’s registration information here.

Once you’ve done your homework, the next step is to vote. Florida’s primary election is Aug. 18.

For those hoping to cast their ballots early, here’s a list of early voting dates available by county.

Early Voting Dates

Brevard County: Aug. 8 to Aug. 15

Monday through Friday: 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Saturday and Sunday: 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Flagler County: Aug. 3 to Aug. 15

Sunday through Saturday: 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Lake County: Aug. 6 to Aug. 15

Sunday through Saturday: 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Marion County: Aug. 8 to Aug. 15

Sunday through Saturday: 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Orange County: Aug. 3 to Aug. 16

Sunday through Saturday: 9 a.m. to 7 p.m.

Osceola County: Aug. 3 to Aug. 16

Sunday through Saturday: 9 a.m. to 7 p.m.

Seminole County: Aug. 8 to Aug. 15

Sunday through Saturday: 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Sumter County: Aug. 8 to Aug. 15

Sunday through Saturday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Volusia County: Aug. 8 to Aug. 15

Sunday through Saturday: 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.

For more information on Central Florida elections, head to Clickorlando.com/results2020.

Ahead of the primary, many voters expressed concerned about their health safety going to the polls.

“I was just going to drop it off,” Orange County voter Rethel Hunter said.

Hunter dropped off her vote by mail ballot Monday. She said that safety for her family is key, so she’s avoiding the polls.

"The crowd, and I wanted to make sure my vote was counted," said Hunter.

In Orange County, elections officials are requiring workers and voters to wear face masks, they’re scanning IDs to avoid contact, and there will be lots of hand sanitizer.

"We have things like Kleenex to use when you touch this stylists or if you want to use a pin that we have we encourage you to bring your own pen," said Bill Cowles, the Orange County Supervisor of Elections. "We have extra masks if you need one, we have sanitizer, gloves if you want to wear gloves while marking your ballot."

But then there are people like Carolyn Placek in Volusia County.

"I do not trust mail in voting," said Placek.

She said she’ll be voting at the polls but has concerns. This comes as elections leaders last week said they’re combining some voting locations to larger areas like at schools to try and prevent the spread of COVID-19.

“I’ve been dealing with cancer, I have an immune system problem. The last thing I wanted to do is put myself in a big crowd, even if they’re 6-feet apart,” said Placek.

Volusia County election officials believe it will be safe.

“We need to social distance between everyone within check-in and the voters as they are voting,” said Lisa Lewis, Volusia County Supervisor of Elections.


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