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SpaceX successfully launches supplies to space station

Launch went up 11:17 a.m. Sunday

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket and Cargo Dragon spacecraft inside the company’s hangar at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida on Dec. 2, 2020, prior to being rolled out to the launch pad in preparation for the 21st Commercial Resupply Services (CRS-21) launch. Photo credit: SpaceX
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket and Cargo Dragon spacecraft inside the company’s hangar at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida on Dec. 2, 2020, prior to being rolled out to the launch pad in preparation for the 21st Commercial Resupply Services (CRS-21) launch. Photo credit: SpaceX (WKMG 2020)

SpaceX launched its 21st cargo supply mission for NASA from Kennedy Space Center Sunday.

The launch was originally scheduled for 11:39 a.m. Saturday but was scrubbed due to inclement weather.

The Cargo Dragon spacecraft will arrive about 24 hours later after launch, bringing 6,400 pounds of research, supplies and goodies for the astronauts.

“For this mission, we’ve got some fresh apples and oranges and lemons going up because astronauts really don’t get an opportunity to eat fresh fruits and vegetables while they’re in space, there’s also going to be some prepared foods for the holiday season, including fixings for a turkey dinner, and some fun desserts,” Scott Williams said about the bounty headed to space.

Currently, there are four NASA astronauts, one Japanese and two Russian cosmonauts on the ISS.

During a NASA briefing Friday, Jennifer Scott Williams, with NASA’s ISS Program Research Office, explained the astronauts work with the Food Lab at Johnson Space Center to pick their favorites for flight, including any special requests.

Sunday’s launch was the first launch with SpaceX’s re-designed cargo capsule, which can now fit 50% more inside than the previous spacecraft, which means more room for science.

[READ MORE: Christmas delivery: Station supply run includes new door to space, fresh fruits and veggies for astronauts]

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