Study finds new COVID-19 variants may not drive spread of virus

Human behavior plays bigger role, researchers say

FILE - This undated electron microscope image made available by the U.S. National Institutes of Health in February 2020 shows the Novel Coronavirus SARS-CoV-2, yellow, emerging from the surface of cells, blue/pink, cultured in the lab. The sample was isolated from a patient in the U.S. According to ananalysisby the federal Centers for Disease Control and Preventionpublished Tuesday, April 6, 2021 in JAMA Pediatrics, most children with a serious inflammatory illness linked to the coronavirus had initial COVID-19 infections with no symptoms or only mild ones, new U.S. research shows. (NIAID-RML via AP, File)
FILE - This undated electron microscope image made available by the U.S. National Institutes of Health in February 2020 shows the Novel Coronavirus SARS-CoV-2, yellow, emerging from the surface of cells, blue/pink, cultured in the lab. The sample was isolated from a patient in the U.S. According to ananalysisby the federal Centers for Disease Control and Preventionpublished Tuesday, April 6, 2021 in JAMA Pediatrics, most children with a serious inflammatory illness linked to the coronavirus had initial COVID-19 infections with no symptoms or only mild ones, new U.S. research shows. (NIAID-RML via AP, File)

ORLANDO, Fla. – A new study of COVID-19 variants shows they may not necessarily drive the increased spread of the coronavirus.

Scientists at the University of Washington recently looked at thousands of coronavirus samples taken from February to July 2020.

[TRENDING: Sneak peek of Universal’s new roller coaster | 23 dead in Mexico City metro collapse | Children 12-15 could soon get vaccine]

At the time, it was believed COVID-19 variants were driving the number of cases. However, researchers discovered it was human behavior that played a bigger role.

Researchers found the variants spread faster in states and countries where officials were slower to order lockdowns or enforce mask mandates.

The study was published in the journal “Science Translational Medicine.”


About the Author: