Marion County looks to eliminate litter with new ordinance. Here are the details

Fines for littering increased, task force expanded

The ordinance expands the Litter Task Force, which previously was mainly made up of law enforcement officers. The task force was formed last year, working to reduce or eliminate litter and illegal dumping. That’s now expanded to other departments, like building inspectors, parks and recreation and animal control officers.

MARION COUNTY, Fla. – Marion County commissioners enacted a new ordinance in hopes of reducing litter in the area.

“The litter ordinance is simply one component of our broader initiative to eliminate litter in Marion County,” said Marion County’s attorney, Matthew Minter, “You might call it the hammer.”

Minter is one of the people who helped this new ordinance become enacted. It is meant to put Marion County more in line with state regulations as well as make it more enforceable if someone is caught littering.

“We see it in parks, some commissioners would see people throwing litter from their cars,” Minter said.

[TRENDING: Here’s what to know about $450 checks for Florida families | Highest-rated seafood restaurants around Orlando, according to Tripadvisor | Become a News 6 Insider (it’s free!)]

The ordinance expands the Litter Task Force, which previously was mainly made up of law enforcement officers.

The task force was formed last year, working to reduce or eliminate litter and illegal dumping.

That’s now expanded to other departments, like building inspectors, parks and recreation and animal control officers.

“The idea for the litter task force is they want to begin with an educational process to help people understand we all have a stake in what our community looks like,” Minter said.

Minter said this new ordinance expands the definition of litter, adding cigarette butts, masks, syringes, drug paraphernalia and temporary political signs in place 60 days after the last applicable election.

The ordinance also upgrades fines and punishment if convicted. On a first conviction the fine increases from $50 to $150.

The second conviction can cost up to a $250 fine plus potentially community service and up to 10 days in jail.

The third conviction can cost a person up to a $500 fine plus community service and up to 30 days in jail

Minter said he hopes with these changes people may think twice about where they dump their trash.

“We can’t solve this problem solely with this ordinance, we all need to work together to solve this problem,” Minter said.

Get today’s headlines in minutes with Your Florida Daily:


About the Author:

Brian Didlake joined the News 6 team as a reporter in March 2021.