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What to know about Florida’s Amendment 6: Transfer of veteran benefits to surviving spouses

Amendment is 1 of 6 voters can expect to see on November ballot

Early voting begins tomorrow
Early voting begins tomorrow
Candidate

Votes

%

Yes
9,305,50390%
No
1,065,30810%
100% of Precincts Reporting

(6,097 / 6,097)

There are two amendments on the Florida 2020 general election ballot that address Homestead property tax benefits, Amendment 6 is one of those but is specifically for spouses of deceased veterans.

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Amendment 6 would ensure the beneficiaries of veterans with combat-related disabilities would continue to receive Homestead tax benefits after the death of the veteran.

[2020 VOTER GUIDE: Everything you need to know ahead of the presidential election | 6 Florida constitutional amendments to be on ballot in November]

Here’s the ballot summary:

“Provides that the homestead property tax discount for certain veterans with permanent combat-related disabilities carries over to such veteran’s surviving spouse who holds legal or beneficial title to, and who permanently resides on, the homestead property, until he or she remarries or sells or otherwise disposes of the property. The discount may be transferred to a new homestead property of the surviving spouse under certain conditions. The amendment takes effect Jan. 1, 2021.”

Read the full text of the amendment here.

Here’s how you should vote on the measure, depending on whether you support or oppose it, according to Ballotpedia.

  • A “yes” vote supports allowing a Homestead property tax discount to be transferred to the surviving spouse of a deceased veteran.
  • A “no” vote opposes allowing a Homestead property tax discount to be transferred to the surviving spouse of a deceased veteran.

Amendment 6 is one of six amendments Florida voters can expect to see on their ballot in the general election, and the language included with the other ballot measures may be just as difficult for voters to interpret on Election Day, which is why they’re encouraged to brush up on the ballot measures before heading to the polls.

Click here for a closer look at all six amendments.


Election Day is Nov. 3.

Click here or visit ClickOrlando.com/results2020 to learn more about what you can expect to see on your ballot.