Orionid meteor shower peaks this week. Here’s when

Peak occurs Oct. 21

While the Orionids aren’t known for their numbers like the Perseids or the upcoming Geminids, the annual meteor shower still puts on a show. The event, which peaks around 2 p.m. ET Friday and will last until Nov. 22, is created by debris leftover by Halley’s Comet produce some of the fastest-moving meteors of the annual showers.

ORLANDO, Fla. – While the Orionids aren’t known for their numbers like the Perseids or the upcoming Geminids, the annual meteor shower still puts on a show.

The event created by debris leftover by Halley’s Comet produce some of the fastest-moving meteors of the annual showers.

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You may notice a few early-morning meteors during the week leading up to Friday’s peak. The moon will become less of a factor as the peak morning of the meteor shower gets closer. The moon will not be a factor during this year’s peak.

Typically, the Orionids produce 10-20 meteors per hour, but occasionally leave long trails in the sky. This shower also sometimes produces bright fireballs.

The best time to view the Orionids will be between midnight and dawn as Orion, the constellation the meteors appear to originate from, gets higher in the sky.

Skies should be mainly clear for most of Central Florida to catch a glimpse of the shower. A jacket may be necessary for this year’s viewing as temperatures will dip into the 50s. It’s best to give your eyes 15-30 minutes to adjust to the darkness for optimal viewing.

Binoculars or telescopes are not needed to view the shower. These devices actually dampen your viewing experience as they limit your field of view. For the best viewing experience, grab a blanket so you’re comfortable and just look up.

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About the Author:

Jonathan Kegges joined the News 6 team in June 2019 as the Weekend Morning Meteorologist. Jonathan comes from Roanoke, Virginia where he covered three EF-3 tornadoes and deadly flooding brought on by Hurricanes Florence and Michael.