Tropics Watch: Florida could be impacted by potential system

Next named storm will be called Nicole

In Florida, all eyes are on a large non-tropical low pressure system that is expected to develop this weekend across the northeastern Caribbean Sea and southwestern Atlantic.

ORLANDO, Fla. – Yes, it’s November, but the tropics are still popping.

In Florida, all eyes are on a large non-tropical low pressure system that is expected to develop this weekend across the northeastern Caribbean Sea and southwestern Atlantic.

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The system is forecast to be very broad and disorganized, but environmental conditions could support gradual subtropical or tropical development beginning early next week while it moves west or northwest over the southwestern Atlantic.

There’s a 40% chance that it develops over the next five days.

It’s too soon to know if the system will organize, how strong the system could become and where exactly it will go. Due to its expected proximity to Florida, however, the Orlando area will see increased rain chances next week.

High seas, strong rip currents and beach erosion are also likely along Central Florida beaches.

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Volusia County warned its residents of the potential impact of the system, saying high surf and large breaking waves from 5 to 12 feet were possible.

“A lot of our coastal properties suffered tremendous damage and erosion from Hurricane Ian,” said Volusia County Emergency Management Director Jim Judge. “This new system heading our way can significantly threaten those properties with more erosion.”

County officials urged residents and visitors to stay off the beach this weekend through early next week.

“With the loss of our sand buffer from Hurricane Ian and the significant coastal damage already sustained, beach conditions during this upcoming weather event are not conducive for beachgoers,” the county said in a news release. “Beach ramps will be closed to driving as weather and tidal conditions warrant. As a safety precaution, all trash cans and port-o-lets will be removed.”

The next named storm will be called Nicole.

Hurricane season ends Dec. 1.


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About the Author:

From chasing tornadoes and tracking the tropics, to forecasting ice storms and other dangerous weather, Troy Bridges has covered it all! Troy is an award-winning meteorologist who always prepares you for the day ahead on the News 6 Morning News.