Weather could cause more travel problems after New Year’s

West, Deep South and Plains are main trouble spots

AMS Certified meteorologist Jonathan Kegges breaks down the active weather pattern that will start the new year.

ORLANDO, Fla. – 2023 will pick up right where 2022 left off in the weather department. Another potent system will dive into the Deep South during the first few days of the new year, bringing with it the potential for another round of significant severe weather.

You may remember the Deep South dealt with two tornado outbreaks in recent months. The highest threat for severe weather including tornadoes will set-up from east Texas and Oklahoma into Arkansas, Louisiana and Mississippi Jan. 2 and 3. The severe weather threat moves into the southeast U.S. Jan. 3 and 4.

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On the cold side of the system, heavy snow will ramp up in the Plains and Upper Midwest. Some uncertainty remains as to where the heaviest snow and ice will fall, but there is the potential for double-digit snowfall totals where the heaviest band sets up.

The West will continue to get pounded by a series of Atmospheric Rivers that will bring a flash-flooding and mudslide threat to the lower elevations of California, Oregon and Washington. The rain, however, will help to significantly improve the severe drought situation ongoing in the West.

In the higher elevations of the Sierra Nevadas, multiple feet of snow will be likely by next weekend.

The active stretch of weather looks to continue across much of the country through the first week of 2023.


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About the Author:

Jonathan Kegges joined the News 6 team in June 2019 as the Weekend Morning Meteorologist. Jonathan comes from Roanoke, Virginia where he covered three EF-3 tornadoes and deadly flooding brought on by Hurricanes Florence and Michael.