Masterpieces at the famous Louvre Museum are now online for the world to see

About 482,000 works have been digitized so far, according to museum

A woman wearing a protective face mask walks past the deserted Napoleon courtyard and the closed Louvre museum and pyramid in Paris, France.
A woman wearing a protective face mask walks past the deserted Napoleon courtyard and the closed Louvre museum and pyramid in Paris, France. (2020 Chesnot)

Traveling to Paris is a dream for many, and one of the things that winds up on to-do lists is visiting the Louvre Museum. It has some of the most famous artwork in the world.

But as we all know, traveling internationally in the past year hasn’t exactly been as easy as in years past.

That means for some people, they’ve missed out on some beautiful sights, but the Louvre doesn’t have to be one of them.

The museum announced on its website that, so that everyone can enjoy the collections it holds, all of the works of the museum have been brought together for the first time online, in a more ergonomic, more visual and more immersive way.

“For the first time, everyone will be able, free of charge, from their computer or smartphone, to access all of the works kept by the Louvre, whether they are exhibited in the Palais, on loan, on deposit or in storage,” said Jean-Luc Martinez, the museum’s president and director.

Some of the most popular pieces inside the Louvre include:

  • The Raft of Medusa
  • The Seated Scribe
  • The Wedding at Cana
  • David with the Head of Goliath
  • Death of the Virgin
  • Coronation of Napoleon
  • The Battle between Love and Chastity

And that’s just to name a few. It’s estimated that about 482,000 works have been digitized so far, with more being added daily.

The Louvre closed after the COVID-19 pandemic began, and it remains closed to the public today -- the main reason why scientific staff has moved so swiftly to get the works online.

“I am convinced that this digital development will further increase the desire of our audiences to physically come to the Palais to discover the works in their materiality,” Martinez said of when the museum reopens.

Click here to search the Louvre Museum’s online collection.


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