77ºF

‘We want another round of direct payments:' Second stimulus package seems likely

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell supports second wave of direct payments

FILE - In this April 23, 2020, file photo, President Donald Trump's name is seen on a stimulus check issued by the IRS to help combat the adverse economic effects of the COVID-19 outbreak, in San Antonio. Hundreds of thousands of dollars in coronavirus relief payments have been sent to people behind bars across the United States, and now the IRS is asking state officials to help claw back the cash that the federal tax agency says was mistakenly sent. (AP Photo/Eric Gay, File)
FILE - In this April 23, 2020, file photo, President Donald Trump's name is seen on a stimulus check issued by the IRS to help combat the adverse economic effects of the COVID-19 outbreak, in San Antonio. Hundreds of thousands of dollars in coronavirus relief payments have been sent to people behind bars across the United States, and now the IRS is asking state officials to help claw back the cash that the federal tax agency says was mistakenly sent. (AP Photo/Eric Gay, File) (Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.)

ORLANDO, Fla. – It’s looking more likely that many Americans will receive a second round of stimulus checks.

Two big questions, however, remain: Who’s eligible? And how much will they receive?

U.S. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said Tuesday that Republicans support a second wave of checks in their coronavirus relief bill, according to Business Insider.

“We want another round of direct payments, direct payments to help American families keep driving our national comeback,” McConnell said.

The development means both major parties and President Donald Trump support a fresh round of payments to Americans.

Republicans are targeting a $1 trillion relief bill, while Democrats want to spend up to $3.5 trillion.

Details about any potential new deal are not known, but McConnell previously floated a $40,000 income cutoff for a new round of checks. Democrats may want the same criteria used for the first round of checks.

In March, Congress authorized direct payments of $1,200 for individuals earning up to $75,000 a year, plus $500 for each dependent child under 17. The amount decreased until phasing out for those making above $99,000. Married couples earning up to $150,000 a year also qualified for the full payment.

An agreement could be reached by the end of July when a $600 per week expansion to unemployment benefits is set to expire.

To keep up with the latest news on the pandemic, subscribe to News 6′s coronavirus newsletter and go to ClickOrlando.com/coronavirus.