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Apopka celebrates Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

City of Apopka celebrated its 12th year of commemorating Dr. King and his life work with a parade

APOPKA, Fla. – It’s been almost 53 years since the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., the activist, and civil rights leader continues to be remembered around the world for his legacy and what he stood for.

The city of Apopka celebrated its 12th year of commemorating Dr. King and his life work with a parade.

“I would like them to reflect on the dream that Dr. King had,” Chairperson for the parade Monique Morris said.

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Morris hopes his dream is reflected on every day and should serve as a way to embrace our differences.

“We wanted to continue to unite together and continue to be together as brothers and sisters in our community, and that today we wanted to continue the legacy of Dr. King and what he stood for, that it’s a day on and not a day off,” Morris said.

During the parade, various Orange County law enforcement units, religious organizations, dance groups, and hundreds of people from all backgrounds came together in South Apopka to celebrate the legend of the civil rights leader.

“I couldn’t be more proud of the community to do this event. I think it’s just a time for us to reflect on how we as a community can come together, that there’s no black or white, it’s one community, it’s the city of Apopka that we’re all in it together and so we all sink or we all swim,” Apopka Mayor Bryan Nelson said.

Apopka High School assistant principal Marcia Owens says the day of remembrance should be used to teach the importance of education.

“As Dr. King said, everyone has a dream and my dream is that all my kids are successful.

Owens said she reflects on Dr. King’s struggle and fight.

“The vision he had for everyone, not just for himself but for everyone. No matter of the color as he said, no matter the creed, no matter of your nationality he just wanted the best for everyone,” Owens said.

President of Apopka High School’s minority leadership scholars Johnny Marshall said it’s a moment of pride to represent his classmates as grand marshal of the event.

“My dream is to see a difference. Actually one of my goals is to become a principal so I can make a difference in the educational system. We all need to be together and be one so we can make sure that this city is great,” Marshall said.


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