Here’s why one Osceola County community is seeing yellow tap water

Discoloration could last for the next 72 hours, Toho Water Authority says

People living in part of Osceola County could be seeing discolored water from their taps for the next couple of days.

OSCEOLA COUNTY, Fla. – People living in part of Osceola County could be seeing discolored water from their taps for the next couple of days.

Toho Water Authority customers in the Harmony area have reported that their water is coming out yellow.

News 6 reached out to Toho Water Authority, which serves that area, for an explanation. The utility said it is “currently flushing the Harmony distribution system to address the recent water coloration and some odor being reported from customers.”

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The yellow color and odor are being caused by Miex treatment system being taken offline for maintenance, according to Toho. The utility said the coloration and odor are naturally occurring in the water and are typically removed by that system.

The yellow color and odor are not harmful to people but could stain clothing, Toho said.

The utility expects the color and odor to improve over the next 72 hours but adds that the discoloration could return over the next two weeks as maintenance continues.

If the discoloration continues after this, customers should call us at 407-944-5000 or email customerservice@tohowater.com.

South Lake Community resident Dale Hall said this happens usually every spring since he’s moved to the 55 and up community three years ago.

“They flush the hydrants immediately before. This time they did not for whatever reason. I had to raise cane to get ‘em to even come out here today,” Hall said. “Before I called (News 6) I called our county commissioner, I called the head of the CDC here.”

Carlos Fuentes, also a South Lake Community resident, said the smell is the worst part.

“It smells like really rotten stuff,” Fuentes said. “You’re taking a shower with this right here, you know, you’re brushing your teeth and you know it’s unacceptable for what we pay right here. If it’s something about maintenance it should be done more often.”


About the Author:

Thomas Mates is a digital storyteller for News 6 and ClickOrlando.com. He also produces the podcast Florida Foodie. Thomas is originally from Northeastern Pennsylvania and worked in Portland, Oregon before moving to Central Florida in August 2018. He graduated from Temple University with a degree in Journalism in 2010.