‘Being in limbo is never a good feeling:’ Student loan forgiveness blocked by federal courts

Law expert says executive order may not be legally viable

Over the weekend, 16 million borrowers received a letter from U.S. Secretary of Education, Miguel Cardona, as President Biden’s executive order for student loan forgiveness faces pushback in federal courts.

Over the weekend, 16 million borrowers received a letter from U.S. Secretary of Education, Miguel Cardona, as President Biden’s executive order for student loan forgiveness faces pushback in federal courts.

The letter reads:

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The federal Student Aid website also shows that applications are no longer being accepted as they work to overturn orders blocking the program.

Raymond Traendly, managing partner at TK Law, broke down why the relief program is up against a number of lawsuits, stating that opponents of the order don’t believe they should have to front the cost for federal loan recipients.

“The main argument that I’ve seen that I don’t believe is very valid, but is has a lot of potential from a political standpoint, is that you’re shifting the risk in obligation of I think the numbers are between 16 and 20% of the American population on 100% of the American population, and that in itself is an injustice,” Traendly said.

With high inflation spurred by government spending, Traendly said that many people are concerned further spending could be a problem.

Traendly adds that it is also a question of whether the executive branch exceeded its authority in making the decision.

“The executive branch isn’t allowed to make its own laws. That is for the legislature,” he said.

The Biden administration asked the U.S. Supreme Court to reinstate the plan, which would forgive up to $20,000 in debt for eligible borrowers.

“When people are trying to make these big decisions during the holidays about where to celebrate or how to celebrate, these things weigh on them very heavily,” Traendly said. “It’s something that affects a lot of people, and being in limbo is never a good feeling.”

He said that many people are upset and beginning to feel like pawns in a game.

“It seems like the only reason for any of it is for political gain, and that’s unfortunate,” Traendly said.

If the orders blocking the program are not overturned by the end of the year, borrowers can expect student loan repayments to resume in January 2023.

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About the Author:

Treasure joined News 6 at the start of 2021, coming to the Sunshine State from Michigan.