Volusia County officials urge residents to be prepared, stay off beaches ahead of Subtropical Storm Nicole

Residents are urged to stay off the beach for at least a week

Volusia County Director of Beach Safety Andy Ethridge said that beach driving and access will close by the end of business day on Monday, Nov. 7 and will remain closed through the duration of the storm.

VOLUSIA COUNTY, Fla. – Volusia County officials are urging residents to stay off of the beaches throughout the week ahead of Subtropical Storm Nicole’s landfall.

Officials warn that the developing late-season area in the Tropics could be a “significant coastal event with dangerous rip currents, perilous waves and high tides.” Coastal waves could break between 5-10 feet that will impact already damaged dunes and sea walls, county officials said.

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On Friday, Nov. 4, Volusia County issued an emergency advisory to coastal residents advising them of the potential dangers of this potential tropical system.

Volusia County officials met on Sunday at the county’s Emergency Operations Center with staff from FEMA, the Florida Department of Emergency Management and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to make plans and share information, the county said in a press release.

Jim Judge, Volusia County’s emergency management director, pointed out that the county is under a tropical storm watch and storm surge watch, cautioning that storm surge combined with high tides and a full moon could be a problem for the coast.

“Storm surge amount of 2 to 4 feet. It could be 5 feet in certain locations.”

Kevin Captain, Community Information Director for Volusia County, warned on Monday that even though the path and intensity of Subtropical Storm Nicole is uncertain, county residents will experience some effects, especially those who live along the coast.

“Now’s the time to start making preparations. Ensure that you have enough food and water. Remove debris around your home,” Captain said.

Sandbag distributions have begun for Volusia and surrounding counties. Additionally, the emergency management team can be reached for sandbag information from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. at 386-254-1500.

Residents are urged to stay off the beach for at least a week due to the dangers presented by wind, high surf and damaged beach structures from the potential storm. Beach ramps will be closed when tides become too high, and rescue vehicles will not be able to access the beach when the driving lanes are underwater, officials said.

Volusia County Director of Beach Safety Andy Ethridge said that beach driving and access will close by the end of business day on Monday, Nov. 7 and will remain closed through the duration of the storm.

“Wait it out and don’t go down at the beach throughout this storm. Stay off the beach, stay out of the water,” Ethridge said.

Volusia County officials also reminded residents that it is currently under a declared state of local emergency as it recovers from Hurricane Ian. They warn residents that many of the structures along the beachfront remain damaged from Ian and are at risk of further damage from future storms.

Coastal residents can call Volusia County Emergency Management at 386-254-1500 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. for more information.


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About the Author:

Jacob joined ClickOrlando.com in 2022. He spent 19 years at the Orlando Sentinel, mostly as a photojournalist and video journalist, before joining Spectrum News 13 as a web editor and digital journalist in 2021.