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Orlando police chief agrees with use of force policy from state association

First thing listed is banning the use of chokeholds unless an officer determines the suspect could cause death or serious harm to others

ORANGE COUNTY, Fla. – The Florida Police Chiefs Association Subcommittee on Accountability and Societal Change release its list of recommendations when it comes to the use of force policy.

The first thing listed is banning the use of chokeholds unless an officer determines the suspect could cause death or serious harm to others.

Another recommendation listed required officers to give a verbal warning before shooting “where feasible.”

The Florida Police Chiefs Association Subcommittee on Accountability and Societal Change, that Chief Broadway was...

Posted by Clermont Police Department (FL) on Thursday, September 3, 2020

The policy suggestions also recommend law enforcement agencies document anytime an officer pulls out their gun, even if they don’t use it.

It also calls for an increase in the responsibility of an officer to intervene if they witness another officer committing misconduct.

The association also recommends a law enforcement agency releases information to the public in a timely manner, and to recruit more officers that better represent the communities they serve.

Orlando Police Chief Orlando Rolon told News 6 that his agency already complies with nearly all of the recommendations. He also said that each of the 900 agencies in the association had a member of the community also take part in the conversation for use of force policy.

“I’m telling you, every team brought something into this process,” said Chief Rolon.

When it comes to chokeholds, Chief Rolon said he agrees with the suggested policy.

“A tool you can use to potentially prevent the loss of life, that is the only time that maybe this should be considered. Otherwise, it should never be part of our day to day ability to handle things on the job,” said Rolon.

Chief Rolon said that his agency wants to release information about incidents as soon as possible, but adds that several factors in an investigator will be determined what information is released and when.

“The only problem with releasing information quickly is how some individuals may be quick to use judgment without potentially analyzing the situation fully,” said Rolon.

The recommendations are not required to be adopted as policy, they are encouraged to its 900 members across Florida.


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