Truck driver shortage could cause gas shortage

25% of tank trucks in fleet parked, trade group says

A customer pumps gas at a station in Richmond, Va., Tuesday, March 16, 2021. Risky stocks seen as nearly untouchable a year ago burst to the market's best performances during the first three months of 2021, headlining a fourth straight quarter of gains for the S&P 500. Stocks of airlines, oil producers and banks soared on expectations that COVID-19 vaccinations and massive spending by the U.S. government are setting the stage for a roaring economic recovery this year. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)
A customer pumps gas at a station in Richmond, Va., Tuesday, March 16, 2021. Risky stocks seen as nearly untouchable a year ago burst to the market's best performances during the first three months of 2021, headlining a fourth straight quarter of gains for the S&P 500. Stocks of airlines, oil producers and banks soared on expectations that COVID-19 vaccinations and massive spending by the U.S. government are setting the stage for a roaring economic recovery this year. (AP Photo/Steve Helber) (Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved)

Gas stations might be running out of gas this summer, but not because of a looming shortage of crude oil or gasoline.

It’s actually because of a truck driver shortage.

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According to the National Tank Truck Carriers, up to 25% of tanker trucks, which carry gasoline, are parked heading into this summer because of a lack of qualified drivers.

At this point in 2019, only 10% of trucks were sitting idle for that reason.

Many drivers left the business a year ago when gasoline demand came to a near halt because of pandemic-related shutdowns.

Also, many driver schools closed early in the pandemic.

Tanker truckers require special certification, including a commercial driver’s license and weeks of training after being hired.