Talk to Tom: Viewers get their Hurricane Ian questions answered

Since 2004, Tom Sorrells has been answering viewer questions during hurricanes

News 6 chief meteorologist answers viewer questions on air. Jake from Melbourne asks Tom about what he should expect during his first hurricane.

ORLANDO, Fla. – Tom Sorrells is taking your questions.

News 6 Chief Meteorologist Tom Sorrells began taking viewer questions Wednesday live on the air as Hurricane Ian bore down on Central Florida.

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Tom says the segments go back to 2004 during Hurricane Charley, in a time before social media. It’s a concept that’s continued with every hurricane that comes through our area.

Take a look at some of the questions Tom answered for viewers so far:

News 6 chief meteorologist answers viewer questions on air. Pam from Orlando asks about how much rain she should expect as Hurricane Ian continues to move through Florida.
News 6 chief meteorologist answers viewer questions on air. Kim from Winter Park wonders if she should hunker down in a room with no windows during Hurricane Ian.
News 6 chief meteorologist answers viewer questions on air. A man from Oakland wonders when the strongest wind gust will hit that area.
News 6 chief meteorologist answers viewer questions on air. Bobby in Hunters Creek wonders what side of the storm is worse in Hurricane Ian.
News 6 chief meteorologist answers viewer questions on air. Don from Kissimmee asks Tom Sorrells if tornado risks go down as Hurricane Ian decreases in strength.
News 6 chief meteorologist answers viewer questions on air. Don from Kissimmee asks whether the tornado risk goes down as a hurricane weakens.

You can listen to every episode of Florida’s Fourth Estate in the media player below:


About the Authors:

Christie joined the ClickOrlando team in November 2021.

Tom Sorrells is News 6's Emmy award winning chief meteorologist. He pinpoints storms across Central Florida to keep residents safe from dangerous weather conditions.