Storms move across Central Florida

Storm chances favor Interstate 95 and south of Orlando

Storm chances will once again be elevated Sunday. After a sunny start, clouds will be quick to bubble back up. Through the morning, the highest chance for a few showers and thunderstorms will be closest to the east coast of Florida.

ORLANDO, Fla. – Storm chances will once again be elevated Sunday. After a sunny start, clouds will be quick to bubble back up. Through the morning, the highest chance for a few showers and thunderstorms will be closest to the east coast of Florida.

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Gradually, storm chances increase into the early afternoon. Storm chances will be at their highest from about 1 p.m. through 5 p.m. The best chance for storms during that time period will tend to be in areas around and south of Orlando.

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Future radar

Storms should fade earlier than they did Saturday evening. Highs Sunday top out in the low 90s.

Storm chances fall to 30% Monday. High temperatures remain in the low 90s.

TROPICS UPDATE:

The tropics remain quiet as whole with no significant development expected over the next five days. There is an outside chance of a quick depression or tropical storm forming near the Texas coast, but the unorganized disturbance is expected to move on shore later Sunday. There are no threats to Florida.

Tropical moisture is surging into Texas as an area of disturbed weather is moving on shore. While the system is better organized, it moves on land Sunday preventing any further development. Flash flooding will be possible, but the rain is much needed in Texas. Saharan dust continues to dominate the tropical Atlantic elsewhere. By the last week of August, there are signs stronger waves will roll off of the continent. The Atlantic basin will become a little less hostile during that time as well.

About the Author:

Jonathan Kegges joined the News 6 team in June 2019 as the Weekend Morning Meteorologist. Jonathan comes from Roanoke, Virginia where he covered three EF-3 tornadoes and deadly flooding brought on by Hurricanes Florence and Michael.