Feeling the summer heat? Here are tips to prevent heat exhaustion

As the temperature rises, the Florida Department of Health provides some tips to help beat that summer heat. ORLANDO, Fla. — The summer season can bring a lot of sunshine but it can also bring high temperatures. The Florida Department of Health is warning residents and visitors about the dangers of heatstroke and heat exhaustion. But they have some tips to help beat the heat and stay cool:Stay hydratedThose who are at high risk of heat-related illness, including the elderly and young children, should stay in an air-conditioned environment (a shopping mall or a public library are good alternatives)If you need to work or exercise outside, take breaks and pace yourselfDo not leave children or pets in parked cars, even if the windows are left openUse sunscreen with a SPF 15 or higherWear a hat and lightweight, light-colored clothingLeave your pets with plenty of water in shady areasCheck local news for extreme heat alerts and safety tipsRead: ‘It’s Hot’: Outdoor workers see an increase in heat-related hazards in Central FloridaHeatstroke symptoms include any of the following:Extremely high body temperature, 103ºF or higherHot, red, dry or damp skinNo sweatingHallucinationsChillsThrobbing headacheConfusion/dizzinessSlurred speechIf someone does experience heatstroke:Call 911 right awayMove the person to a cooler placeHelp lower the person’s temperature with cool cloths or a cool bathDo not give the person anything to drinkRead: How gas prices are impacting summer travelHeat exhaustion symptoms include:Heavy sweatingExtreme weakness or fatigueDizziness/confusionNauseaCold clammy/moist skinPale or flushed complexionMuscle crampsSlightly elevated body temperatureFast/shallow breathingRead: Heat wave forces more than 50 million Americans under heat advisoriesWhat to do for heat exhaustion:Move to a cool placeLoosen your clothesPut cool, wet towels/cloths on your body or take a cool bathSip waterGet medical help right away if:You are throwing upYour symptoms get worseYour symptoms last longer than 1 hourClick here to download the free WFTV news and weather apps, click here to download the WFTV Now app for your smart TV and click here to stream Channel 9 Eyewitness News live. ©2022 Cox Media Group

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Power out? Here are food safety tips

Carolyn Price empties a fridge on the lower level of her property in Matagorda, Texas before Hurricane Harvey makes landfall Friday, Aug. 25, 2017. With power out to tens of thousands in the area, the Florida Department of Health in Orange County offers these food safety tips:Thaw foods in the refrigerator before cooking or serving-- Keep cold foods at 41 degrees F or below-- Cook foods for a minimum of 15 seconds as indicated below-- Chicken and other poultry and stuffed meats - 165 degrees F-- Ground beef and other ground meats - 155 degrees F-- Pork, beef, eggs, and other meats - 145 degrees F-- Once cooked, keep hot foods at 140 degrees F or above-- Cool hot foods rapidly to 41 degrees F, or below, within 4 hours of servingHandling foods-- Do not touch ready-to-eat foods with bare hands-- Use utensils to handle food, whenever possibleShould I keep it? -- If possible, do not keep leftovers. When in doubt – throw it out! Wash hands frequently with soap and running water-- After using the bathroom-- Before handling food-- When switching between raw and cooked foods-- After eating, drinking, or smoking-- After changing a diaper-- Whenever hands become contaminated-- Between changing gloves-- Make sure to keep soap and paper towels at all handwashing sinksWear gloves properly-- Wash hands and put on new gloves before handling food-- Never re-use or wash gloves-- Change gloves once they become soiled or discolored-- Change gloves when switching between raw and cooked foods-- Change gloves whenever hands become contaminated-- Always wash hands before changing into a new pair of gloves-- Remove gloves before eating, drinking, smoking, or taking out the garbageFor more information, contact your county health department or visit www.floridahealth.gov or www.FloridaDisaster.org.

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